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Public Support for Educators and In-Person Instruction During the Covid-19 Pandemic

In spring 2020, nearly every U.S. public school closed at the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. Existing evidence suggests that local political partisanship and teachers union strength were better predictors of fall 2020 school re-opening status than Covid case and death rates. We replicate and extend these analyses using data collected over the 2020-21 academic year. We demonstrate that Covid case and death rates were meaningfully associated with initial rates of in-person instruction. We also show that all three factors—Covid, partisanship, and teachers unions—became less predictive of in-person instruction as the school year continued. We then leverage data from two nationally representative surveys of Americans’ attitudes toward education and identify an as-yet undiscussed factor that predicts in-person instruction: public support for increasing teacher salaries. We speculate that education leaders were better able to manage the logistical and political complexities of school re-openings in communities with greater support for educators.

Education level
Document Object Identifier (DOI)
10.26300/ek3z-x247

EdWorkingPaper suggested citation:

Houston, David M., and Matthew P. Steinberg. (). Public Support for Educators and In-Person Instruction During the Covid-19 Pandemic. (EdWorkingPaper: 22-575). Retrieved from Annenberg Institute at Brown University: https://doi.org/10.26300/ek3z-x247

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